Sunday, March 1, 2015

Spanish Steps in Roma



The Spanish Steps, also known as Scalinata della Trinita dei Monti in Italian, are among the most famous images in history. They are found in Italy, Rome. They climb a steep slope from Piazza di Spagna at the bottom side to the Dei Monte at the top where the Trinita church stands. They are a popular tourist attraction and had the highest number of visitors in the city during the Renaissance period.



The 135 steps of the stairway were built with 20,000 scudi of Etienne’s bequeathed funds between 1723 and 1725. They link the Spanish Embassy and the Trinita church. Alessandro Francesco Sanctis are the two architects responsible for designing the stairway.



Cardinal Mazarin later took an interest in the project which had been clearly stipulated in the will of Gueffier. He entrusted it to an agent who had a plan of including a Louis XIV monument. The inclusion was not accepted by the papal Rome. After the death of Mazarin in 1661, Gueffier’s nephew claimed half of the will which rendered the project dormant. Pope Clement is the one who renewed some interest in it.

 The Early Baroque fountain at the base, Piazza di Spagna, was built between 1627 and 1629. Pietro Bernini was credited for its construction, with his son said to have helped in the decoration. He had been an architect for the pope since 1623, on the Acqua Vergine project.




The stairway was constructed after many generations of heated arguments over how urbanized the steep slope should be. Drawings found in archives from around 1580 show the interests of Pope Gregory in constructing stairs to a fa├žade of the church. Gasper also had his own idea in 1963, of a wooded slope, which is still conserved in Rome.



To get to the Spanish Steps, take the red line by metro and make your exit at Spagna. The Spanish Steps are right next to the station. Many buses will only get to Piazza del Popolo or Barberini, a walking distance of about 10 minutes away.


17 comments:

  1. Larkin3/01/2015

    I really enjoyed this article though as your photos are very vivid and makes the places come to life for me. I would love to visit these places one day to see if they're as amazing as I really think they are.

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  2. Such incredibly ornate buildings and statues! These old places certainly have a lot of charm. And, they're so well preserved. Beautiful images, thank you for sharing.

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  3. Quite the iconic place to see. I have this on my list of places to see. I wish the US had sights like this. Anyways, I would love to see this place soon. I've been hoping to do some traveling this coming summer, so here's hoping I can see the Spanish Steps.

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    1. It was really great to sit on those steps and took a break after walking for miles.

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  4. I imagine how much of a workout it'd be to run up and down these steps. I really love the design of the water fountain though, it's a total work of art and something special. I really hope to one day see this place in person, as I hope to see many places you go to see Kate. Thanks for sharing all of your travels with us, it's really cool of you. Please travel more for us that cannot. Have a good day!

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    1. (: Now I want to go back there and run up and down. Thanks so much for your compliment!

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  5. oh Kate! You have such exciting adventures. I wish that I could be more like you, very brave to go out to see the world. I feel very encouraged reading about the things you have done, even by yourself. It makes me think I could be the same way too. Keep it up. :)

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    1. You can do it too Bevearly. I do appreciate your compliment.

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  6. Hmmmm wonderful architectural design and nice sculptures. I really think you can make a wall paper out of this blog with this pictures Kate. You are immortalizing these pictures for future generations. Great work!

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    1. Thank you so much for all your comments Joseph! So sorry for my late response.

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  7. The staircase looks really old but strong and beautiful with marble.

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  8. But on a second thought, why should there be an argument over the creation of a mere stair case or are there more significant features or reasons attached to it than we literally think?

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    1. There are a lot of things in history that we can't understand. (: Very nice input! Thank you.

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