Sunday, November 23, 2014

Sunday Travel Photo #21: Palace of Holyroodhouse, Scotland

 Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh, Scotland. March 2014.


The Palaceof Holyroodhouse, also commonly referred to as Holyrood Palace, is the official residence of the Scottish monarch in Scotland.

Located at the bottom of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, at the opposite end to EdinburghCastle, Holyrood Palace has served as the principal residence of the Kings and Queens of Scots since the 16th century, and is a setting for state occasions and official entertaining.

A brief history of Holyroodhouse Palace

This Palace is the Queen's official Edinburgh residence and has frequently been at the center of Scottish history, it was where James II and James IV were each married, where James V and Charles I were crowned, and where "Bonnie Prince Charlie" held court in 1745.

When the Queen's away, public access is permitted to the stunning Historic Apartments (former home of Mary Queen of Scots) and the State Apartments, famous for their fine furnishings, tapestries and plasterwork.

James IV constructed a new palace adjacent to the abbey in the early 16th century, and James V made additions to the palace, including the present north-west tower.

Holyrood Palace was re-constructed in its present form between 1671 and 1679 to the Baroque design of the architect Sir William Bruce, forming four wings around a central courtyard, with a west front linking the 16th-century north-west tower with a matching south-west tower.


Holyroodhouse Today

Queen Elizabeth spends one week in residence at Holyrood Palace at the beginning of each summer, where she carries out a range of official engagements and ceremonies.

The 16th century Historic Apartments of Mary, Queen of Scots and the State Apartments, used for official and state entertaining, are open to the public throughout the year, except when members of the Royal Family are in residence.

If they're not visiting, the palace is open for tour, and you'll need at least two hours to view the King James Tower, the crumbling 12th century abbey, the Royal Dining Room and the Throne Room, among others.

The Great Gallery is also worthy of a mention with its portraits of Scottish kings, both legendary and real.

Tours are also available of neighboring 12th century Holyrood Abbey, founded by King David I. Afterwards, be sure to snap a shot of the lovely Holyroodhouse Fountain outside the palace.


How to get there

By train: Edinburgh Waverley Station.  The Palace is 15 minute walk from the station.
By bus: Number 6 and 35 stop near the Palace.

My hotel was on the Royal Mile, which is walking distance to the Palace of Holyrood House and Edinburgh Castle.  It was a very nice walk in the freezing weather.


"It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop."  -Confucius


10 comments:

  1. Wow!! I never knew Scotland had such a rich culture. Now I know why it is part of the UK. anything that brings out royalty in display amazes me. What about the charges?? Do they charge 'royal charges' to get in? Just Curios

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    1. There is no charges to get in. The immigrations officers treat the Americans very well. I used to hold my country passport before so I see a huge difference. (: Scotland is my favorite so far.

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  2. it seems like a good place. if the Queen of England spends time there, it must be an awesome place. thanks for this article. Also mention your experience with the people in Scotland..are they friendly??

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    1. The Scottish people are very friendly. The women are very beautiful. I met a couple on express bus. I was looking at a map. They asked if they could help and guided me where to go and what to see in Edinburgh. I love the people from Scotland!

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  3. It would be a dream to see Scotland, especially the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Scotland. I have never been to Scotland, but it's one place I've dreamed of going to ever since my Father showed me his adventures there.

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    1. Nicole, promise your father that you will go see those in person. (: I hope you will make it soon!

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  4. Loved it here, more to see than the castle which was a disappointment. Get an audio guide as they are worth listening to and wander around taking in history and charm. Well worth a visit. As is the café.

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    1. It is true that there is more to see than Edinburgh castle. I didn't visit the cafe though.

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  5. i want to travel and travel many awesome place world wide
    i like this place

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    1. Hey world traveler, sounds good to me!

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